The Scribbler logo.I’ve got something a little different this week! You’ve probably heard of these monthly subscription box programs that have been so popular lately. If not, here’s how it works: people send out monthly mystery gift boxes based on a theme. You sign up, and you get mailed a box every month. I’ve never signed up for one before, although I’ve been mightily tempted–there’s a lot of cool stuff out there!

Then I saw a writing-related one, and I couldn’t resist anymore.

Scribbler, which you can find at goscribbler.com, was created by two authors: Victoria Scott and Lindsay Cummings. Each box comes with a novel, a “writing passport” with tips and tricks from the author of that book, an exclusive invitation to an event with an industry professional, and some goodies.

The first Scribbler box launched last week, on March 23. Let’s look at what was in it!

The Goodies

Let’s get the little stuff out of the way. This box came with:

The Scribbler box poster: I will write 500 words and I will write 500 more!

A mini-poster. This was printed on heavyweight paper and was coiled to fit into the box. Interesting idea, but I had to pin the heck out of it to make it lie flat.

Decal that reads #WRITER.

A decal. Slap it on your stuff.

A sheet of stickers. It includes multicolored typewriters reading 'word count'

Word count stickers. Cute and colorful, although I admit that I don’t know how you’d use them. I write on the computer and I keep track of my words in Excel. I guess if you had a calendar and wanted to give yourself some kudos, you could put one up for every day you write? Unfortunately, these are also tiny. You’d need a fine-point pen and a careful hand to put four digits on these.

A set of 10 Yoobi mini-highlighters in a rainbow of colors.

Mini-highlighters! They’re on the small side (as you can tell from the mini) but they’re cute and come in a variety of colors. It’s also a pretty nice brand. This is probably my favorite gift out of the goodies.

Pencil bag that reads 'The Throne of Glass Series, From #1 Bestselling Author Sarah. J. Maas, worldofsarahjmaas.com, Bloomsbury.'

Photo Mar 26, 11 10 49 AM

And a little pencil bag from the Throne of Glass series. I’m not the largest fan of the design. The back is alright (it has a tagline from the series, at least) but the front seems kind of silly. I’d rather have a picture or a logo. It seems a bit anticlimactic to literally write just “The Throne of Glass Series” on a bag.

The book!

Brigid Kemmerer's More than We Can Tell, next to an autographed bookmark, an autographed sticker, and temporary tattoos that resemble the cover of the book.

This month’s box came with Brigid Kemmerer’s More Than We Can Tell, a YA contemporary. It also comes with a few goodies for fans of the author, including:

  • A plain sticker with Ms. Kemmerer’s signature on it, so you can stick it wherever you want
  • A bookmark, also signed, from Ms. Kemmerer’s previous book, Letters to the Lost
  • A set of temporary tattoos consisting of the text bubbles seen on the cover of the book.

More Than We Can Tell is a bit out of my genre, unfortunately–I will read almost any genre fiction and non-fiction, but contemporary fiction has never been my cup of tea. But this seems like a highly acclaimed book from a really successful author, and I am probably now required to at least give it a shot.

The Writing Passport

Small, stapled pamphlet reading 'Writing Passport: Emotional Touchpoints, Volume 1, March 2018.'

Going hand-in-hand with More than We Can Tell is this month’s Writing Passport. This is a regular feature where the author of this month’s book gives some tips on how to do the things they do best.

It’s a cute little book. It’s a decent length (23 pages) and is printed on decent, sturdy paper. It includes an introduction from the Scribbler team that explains what the pamphlets are for and how the Scribbler boxes generally differ from other boxes. Then there’s a bio for Ms. Kemmerer and her tips on Emotional Touchpoints.

She briefly goes through her approach and includes three mini-exercises. I didn’t take toooo very much away from them–the tips weren’t radically different from what I’ve read in most books on craft. All in all, it was a nice, quick read, with some nice concepts, but nothing super groundbreaking.

A Special Invitation to an Event with an Agent

An invitation to an exclusive skype chat with Literary Agent Mandy Hubbard. Explains that a private link will be emailed before the chat.

Now this is something I’m excited about: an event with Mandy Hubbard from the Emerald City Literary Agency. Apparently, the folks who signed up for this Scribbler box will get to attend a Skype chat with her.

I have absolutely no idea what it will entail. But isn’t that awesome?

Unfortunately, I’m not quite as excited as I could be, because while Ms. Hubbard represents YA, including fantasy, it looks like she only wants stuff with strong romance elements. And I… am definitely not writing anything that can be considered fantasy-romance. So if this does turn out to be a pitch event (and it may not!) I don’t know how much it’d help me. A presentation from an agent is always a fun and illuminating experience, though!

The concept is absolutely killer, and this is, hands down, the most useful and interesting part of the box.

And that’s it!

So what do I think? I don’t know!

…What, “I don’t know”? Yeah, that was a lame response. Sorry. But I really don’t know how I feel. I’m truly excited about the agent invitation, even though I don’t know what kind of event it is. And it really doesn’t matter what kind of event it is! It’s an awesome idea, and the idea of getting something like this every single month is amazing.

But outside of that, I admit I’m kind of meh. Out of the goodies, the only thing I really love are the highlighters. They may be mini, but they are genuinely something I’d buy on a whim.

The others? Ehhh. I’ll probably slap the decal on my laptop, but it’s nothing I’d normally go out of my way to get. The wordcount stickers are a nice idea, but they’re small. And again, when and how am I going to use them?

The book may be highly rated, but I really don’t read contemporary. Like, ever. (Wouldn’t a touching tale of two kids in school be better if they were slipping through time, or possessed of an ancient power, or at least being hunted by a creature of pure darkness? No? Come on. Can’t it at least be set in space?) Is it good to read widely? Yes. Should I read it anyway, because the author is really good at what she does? Maybe? But I have such a long reading list already!

All in all, this is… pretty much par the course for a subscription box. It’s a gamble. You spend a chunk of money and hope, at the end of it, that you get enough stuff that you actually like. And for me, I’m on the line. The agent thing is great. So are the highlighters (but, then again, they’re $5, and this box is $30/month.) The pamphlet is a cool idea, although I didn’t get much out of this month’s.

So is this a good value? Financially, it’s reasonably priced–a hardcover book, one $5 big-ticket item, and a bunch of tiny goodies is a good amount of content for $30. But it’s a subscription box, and that means that you might end up getting a bunch of stuff that isn’t up your alley.

Personally? I’d love to see more craft-related stuff, even if it’s just a one-sentence thing that fits on a notecard: a writing prompt. A step-by-step writing exercise. A challenge. Something that tells people to go out and write something. The pamphlet kinda scratches that itch, but I’d love to see more.

All in all, it’s not a bad box for a writer. I wasn’t blown away by this box, but I’m interested enough to give it another month. And if you’re interested, give the April box a look–it’s about point of view!

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