Screenshot of the cover of 'Rock Your Plot: A Simple System for Plotting Your Novel.'

Hotlinked from Goodreads.

I recently finished Rock Your Plot by Cathy Yardley, and my very short review is on Gooodreads. But, like always, I’m going to leave the review on Goodreads and ramble about what it meeeeeeans to me here.

This has not, so far, been a very good year for writing. I’ll write about that later, I’m sure. But one of the symptoms of this not good year is that the stories I’m working on have issues that should have been hashed out in my outlines. And for some reason or another, my outlines aren’t working.

This is an incredibly obnoxious problem, because it’s new. I have a very well established system for outlining, and it’s never steered me wrong. I wrote 6 manuscripts this way, so what the heck is going wrong?

Short answer: I don’t know. But it’s dumb.

So in comes Rock Your Plot. This is a pretty simple book. It’s short. It’s basic. And it covers a bunch of stuff that you probably already know about (well, assuming that you enjoy outlining.) At its core, it combines the philosophy of Goal/Motivation/Conflict with a very standard story structuring system, and uses this to create a scene-by-scene outline.

And this appeals to me. I don’t know if it works yet–I’m only starting my outline now–but it got me to write half of a new outline (and quickly!) so it seems to be working so far. I like it because it’s close what I normally do, while being different enough to make me think about why I’m doing what I’m doing.

I’ve written a lot about my system. I like to start with a word count (usually ~70-80K for Young Adult fantasy), guestimate my average chapter length (which I know is 3,500-4,000), and calculate my approximate number of chapters (usually 20). These are beautiful, round numbers. I never write according to this formula–being flexible is the whole reason it works–but it makes it easy to write the first outline. And that’s all I needed to get my thoughts on paper before I tried my first draft.

Rock Your Plot is extremely similar, except she breaks the story into scenes instead of chapters. (And really, this is a pretty common–and sensible, given that a “chapter” can be an incredibly subjective thing.) Then it uses the Goal/Motivation/Conflict system for every scene and every major character, so you can test that every scene is moving the story forward and maintaining tension.

So it’s what I used to do, but more methodical. Mostly, it’s just making me think.

And… so far, so good. I’m not done with my new outline, so I don’t know how it’ll turn out, but the concept behind Rock Your Plot is eminently sensible. And if you’re a detailed person who loves outlining, it may appeal to you, too.

Mostly, it just got me outlining something again. And that’s exactly what I needed to do right now.

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